Photo of Jesse T. Foley

Jesse T. Foley is a labor associate and a member of the Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation Group.

Jesse has a diverse practice advising multiemployer and single-employer clients on all aspects related to the legal compliance and tax qualification of ERISA-covered pension and welfare plans, including the treatment of such plans in corporate financings and transactions.

In his multiemployer practice, he represents a number of funds, counseling Boards of Trustees on issues such as healthcare compliance, cybersecurity, government investigations, benefit suspensions, special financial assistance, and withdrawal liability.

In addition, Jesse advises private, public, and not-for-profit employers on all aspects of their non-qualified executive compensation arrangements.  Jesse regularly provides technical and practical advice on the establishment, administration, and continued legal compliance of deferred compensation and supplemental employee retirement plans.  As part of his practice, Jesse routinely negotiates and drafts equity plans and awards, employment agreements, severance agreements, and other compensation arrangements.

Jesse earned his J.D. degree from the University of Southern California, where he was a Senior Editor of the Southern California Law Review.  Jesse also frequently contributes to Proskauer’s Employee Benefits & Executive Compensation Blog.

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected a challenge to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the drug mifepristone, which is used as part of a two-drug protocol to induce abortion.  The Court ruled that the providers seeking to overturn the FDA approval did not have standing, because the providers were not directly

Glass Lewis (“GL”) recently released its annual Benchmark Policy Guidelines for 2024.  This update makes several changes to how the proxy advisory firm will evaluate company policies related to executive compensation.  Institutional Shareholder Services (“ISS”) also released updates to its voting policies for 2024, including new and updated responses to its Compensation Policies FAQ.

The day after Thanksgiving, while many of us were fortunate enough to be reaching for leftover pie, the IRS released proposed regulations implementing the requirement that 401(k) plan sponsors permit “long-term part-time employees” to make elective contributions to a 401(k) plan.  These proposed regulations arrive just one month before the statutory requirements are set to

On November 9th, the IRS announced additional inflation adjustments for 2024, including to the annual contribution and carryover limits for healthcare flexible spending accounts and the monthly limit for qualified transportation fringe benefits. The IRS did not increase the annual contribution limit for dependent care flexible spending accounts because that limit is not indexed to

On November 1st, the IRS released a number of inflation adjustments for 2024, including to certain limits for qualified retirement plans. As expected, this year’s adjustments are more modest than last year’s significant increases. The table below provides an overview of the key adjustments for qualified retirement plans.

Qualified Defined Benefit Plans
20232024

Last week, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit affirmed in part and vacated in part a Texas federal district court order revoking the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of the drug mifepristone, which is used as part of a two-drug regimen to induce abortion.  The Fifth Circuit vacated the district

In late July, the Departments of Labor, Treasury, and Health and Human Services released proposed regulations implementing the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 (MHPAEA).  Readers of our previous blog will recall that the proposed regulations include a new three-part framework for evaluating “non-quantitative treatment limitations” (NQTLs) imposed on plan benefits.  NQTLs

In the most recent sign that special COVID-19 benefit plan rules are drawing to a close, last Friday, the IRS issued Notice 2023-37, which clarifies the scope of COVID-19 testing and treatment that can be provided on a pre-deductible basis under a high deductible health plan (HDHP) without impacting a participant’s ability to contribute to a health savings account (HSA).  As a reminder, if an HDHP covers medical items and services before the participant satisfies the IRS minimum deductible (self-only or family), that coverage may disqualify the participant’s HSA contributions.  Notice 2023-37 can be downloaded here.

Last Friday, the United States Supreme Court stayed a federal district court order that suspended  the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s approval of the drug mifepristone, which is used as part of a two-drug regimen to induce abortion.  This decision means that mifepristone will remain available subject to current FDA dispensation guidelines while the appeal of the district court’s decision proceeds through the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit (and potentially the Supreme Court).  Although the Supreme Court’s decision returns mifepristone access to the status quo for the time being, it creates a number of questions for employers and other benefit plan sponsors with respect to abortion coverage in group health plans, which we discuss below.

Important Update: Based on informal comments from the U.S. Department of Labor, it appears that the tolling of benefit plan deadlines will end on July 10, 2023, as described in our earlier blog on this subject, notwithstanding the legislation that was signed on Monday ending the COVID-19 National Emergency on April 10th